2021 Fire Safety Initiatives

Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week

Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week

November 1-7, 2021

Carbon Monoxide (CO) is known as the “silent killer” because it is an invisible, tasteless, and odourless gas that can be deadly. CO is produced when fuels such as propane, gasoline, natural gas, heating oil, or wood do not burn completely in fuel-burning appliances and devices. Fuel-burning appliances can include furnaces, hot water heaters, gas or wood fireplaces, portable fuel-burning heaters and generators, barbeques, stoves, and vehicles. 

Prevent CO in your home

  • Install CO alarms on every level of your home and outside each sleeping area.
  • Ensure fuel-burning appliances, chimneys, and vents are properly maintained, as well as cleaned and inspected annually. Visit Technical Safety BC to find a licensed contractor near you.
  • Check that all outside appliance vents are not blocked.
  • Never use barbeques inside garages, even if the garage doors are open. Only use them outside, away from all doors, windows, vents, and other building openings.
  • Portable fuel-burning generators should only be used outdoors in well-ventilated areas away from windows, doors, vents, and other building openings.
  • Never use the stove or oven to heat your home.
  • Open a chimney flue before using a fireplace for adequate ventilation.
  • Never run a vehicle or other fuelled engine or motor inside a garage, even if the garage doors are open. Always remove a vehicle from the garage immediately after starting it.

Know the symptoms of CO

  • Exposure to CO can cause flu-like symptoms such as headaches, nausea, dizziness, as well as confusion, drowsiness, loss of consciousness, and death.
  • If your CO alarm sounds, and you or other occupants are suffering from symptoms of CO poisoning, get everyone out of the home immediately. Then call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number from outside.
  • If your CO alarm sounds, and no one is suffering from symptoms of CO poisoning, check to see if the battery needs replacing, or the alarm has reached its "end-of-life" before calling 9-1-1.

Know the sound of your CO alarm

  • Your CO alarm sounds different than your smoke alarm. Test BOTH alarms monthly and make sure everyone in your home knows the difference between the two alarm sounds.
  • Don’t be confused by the sound of your CO alarm’s low-battery warning. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions so you know the difference between the low-battery warning, the “end-of-life” warning, and the alarm alerting you to the presence of CO in your home.

For more info visit:


Fire Sprinklers

Fire Prevention Week 2021

October 3 – 9, 2021

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety!” works to educate everyone about the different sounds that smoke and carbon monoxide alarms make. Knowing what to do when an alarm sounds will keep you and your family safe. When an alarm makes noises – a beeping sound or a chirping sound – you must take action.

What’s the difference between smoke alarms and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms? Why do I need both?

Smoke alarms sense smoke well before you can, alerting you to danger. In the event of fire, you may have as little as two minutes to escape safely, which is why smoke alarms need to be in every bedroom, outside of the sleeping areas (like a hallway), and on each level (including the basement). Do not put smoke alarms in your kitchen or bathrooms.

Carbon monoxide is an odourless, colorless gas that displaces oxygen in your body and brain and can render you unconscious before you even realize something is happening to you. Without vital oxygen, you are at risk of death from carbon monoxide poisoning in a short time. CO alarms detect the presence of carbon monoxide and alert you so you can get out, call 9-1-1, and let the professionals check your home.

How do I know which smoke and CO alarm to choose for my home?
Choose an alarm that is listed with a testing laboratory, meaning it has met certain standards for protection. Whether you select a unit that requires yearly changing of batteries, or a 10-year unit that you change out at the end of the 10 years, either will provide protection.

What if someone in my home is deaf or hard of hearing?

There are smoke alarms and alert devices that alert people who are deaf or hard of hearing. These devices include strobe lights that flash to alert people when the smoke alarm sounds. Pillow or bed shakers designed to work with your smoke alarm also can be purchased and installed. 

For more information visit the Fire Prevention Week website.

Attention Teachers!

The Office of the Fire Commissioner is hosting a poster & video contest for all students from kindergarten to grade 12 attending an Indigenous, public or independent school in BC. There are some fantastic prizes to be won! Visit the Province of British Columbia Fire Prevention Week website for more details!


Fire Sprinklers

Home Fire Sprinkler Week

May 16-22, 2021

Home fire sprinklers, along with smoke alarms, carbon monoxide alarms and home escape plans provide a complete system of home fire safety. Did you know…

  • Home Sprinklers save lives and property; they may also reduce homeowner’s insurance premiums
  • Fire Departments typically use about 10 times as much water as a fire sprinkler would use to contain a fire
  • Burnt toast will not activate a fire sprinkler. Only the high temperature of a fire will activate the fire sprinklers
  • They are easy to maintain. Just inspect your home to make sure the sprinklers are not blocked by something that would prevent water from coming out such as paint, and be sure the main valve is never turned off

Home Fire Sprinkler Week is a project of the National fire Protection Association Fire Sprinkler Initiatives and the Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition Canada. For more information, visit:


Burn Awareness Week

February 7-13, 2021

Did you know that the most common cause of burn injuries to children is not fire, but rather scalds from liquids such as hot drinks and tap water? Most of these burn injuries are preventable. Each year an estimated 9,000 children in Canada visit hospital emergency room for burns and close to 1,000 are hospitalized as a result of these injuries. 

Each year the Township of Langley Fire Department is pleased to support Burn Awareness Week Program through the British Columbia Professional Firefighters’ Burn Fund.

This program is educational, fun and interactive and is designed for children aged 6 - 12. More information and activities can be found at burnfund.org.

Scald & Burn Safety:

  • When using taps, turn the COLD water on first, and then add HOT water. Reverse when turning water off; turn off the HOT water first then the COLD water.
  • Always test young children’s bath and sink water before using. When bathing children, never leave them unattended as they may turn on the hot water or slip in your absence.
  • Be very careful when drinking HOT liquids, especially around children. At 60 C (140 F) it takes less than five seconds to get a third degree burn. Children and older adults, by virtue of their thinner skin, sustain serve burns at lower temperatures and in less time than an adult.
  • Discuss the dangers around a stove. Teach children to never touch anything on the stove, or to open the oven.
  • Discuss GOOD fires and Bad fires and how matches and lighters are to be used in a responsible manner.
  • Kitchen and appliance safety is important in every household. Burns received in the kitchen are usually a result of scalds from hot foods or liquids, or contact burn from hot appliances.
  • More than half of people injured in fire involving cooking equipment were hurt while attempting to fight the fire themselves.
  • Within seconds of a burn injury, the burned area should be place in, or flushed with, cool water. Keep the burned area in the cool water for 10 - 15 minutes. NEVER use ice, ointments or butter.